Bio

I am an artist, facilitator, strategist and organizational change consultant who works in diverse contexts – from government, social services and arts organizations to educational institutions, grass roots community groups, ethnic and faith groups, and corporations – to cultivate belonging, equity and transformation. In my work with the City of Seattle Race and Social Justice Initiative (RSJI) for the last 6 years, I have designed policies, strategies, partnerships and trainings to build racial equity across 28 City departments, three branches of government and local, regional and national community groups. A significant thrust of this work has been the use of arts and culture as strategies to shift the culture of the institution while supporting community power.

A former Seattle Arts Commissioner, I mobilize nationally through my work with the Government Alliance on Race and Equity (GARE), whose Arts & Culture Work Group I currently co-chair. Locally, I organize with European Dissent, the white anti-racist collective of The People’s Institute network, and several Jewish justice groups. I received a 2012 American Association of University Women Career Development Grant to complete a Master’s in Social Work at the University of Washington where I was certified in and taught Intergroup Dialogue on race, gender and class. I continue to teach as an instructor with the University of Washington Museology Graduate Program. I also worked for over 10 years developing and managing arts-based programing in prisons and jails, and for young people on diversion, probation and parole. In 2016, I was part of the team that received an Americans for the Arts Public Art Network Year in Review Award for Creative Justice, an anti-racist, arts-based alternative to youth incarceration in King County, WA.

My artistic practice, like all of my work, honors the alchemic power of relationships – from meditative installations that organize my collection of loved, urban detritus to social projects that organize people to action for racial and social justice through performance, ritual, dialogue and object creation.

In all of my work and life practices, I strive to show up present and fully whole, drawing from the spirits of my ancestors and the knowing I hold as a mother, a Jew, an artist, a white woman, someone living with chronic illness and the daughter of a Venezuelan immigrant. Whether in the studio, classroom or conference room, I root myself in creativity, spirituality, compassion and a commitment to collective change.